Hospitality Design

by admin, November 27, 2015

hospitality design image

Today, leisure caters to a clientele that’s pressed for time as never before, yet still longs to unplug, engage, and enjoy.

Working only in the Leisure sector—hospitality and Retail — D + P has tapped into this new reality and found that the clientele is supercharging its preferences in a way that affects leisure’s real and virtual contexts. “The customer is king,” says Philip Doyle. “Whether you’re buying a car, shopping for glasses, or booking a hotel, you do your research first. Informed individuals drive the market—they’re not ‘consumers’ in the old sense, responding passively to market cues.”

At a time when the speed of digital technologies is eclipsing what can be done with bricks and mortar flexibility is as important to the overall scheme as the brand itself. Leisure settings need to be very fluid It’s important to stay open and be as fleet of foot as you can to deliver what customers require. You don’t want to lock yourself into something that will quickly go out of date, the rise of interactive design and the use of handheld devices and customised digital interfaces as a means to enrich and enhance leisure activities.

The need to renew

Long-established hotels are re-examining their brand, seeking ways to provide continued value to their customers while making strategic improvements that add more comfort and style—or just a new attitude.

Renovate Property

Renovation is required for many properties—whether due to new ownership, re-flagging, property improvement plans (PIPs) or simply age—and can be implemented all at once or in phases. Public lobbies are renovated to offer a more flexible, comfortable, living room lounge, while upgraded spaces like meeting and conference rooms offer opportunities for increased event revenue. Back-of-house renovations improve operational efficiencies and maximize the use of real estate. And guest room renovations enhance customer comfort and loyalty.


 

reinvestinginhoteldesignReinvesting in Hotel Design expert Guide – Download now

With renewed sources of capital, hotel owners, operators and brands are investing again—seizing the opportunity to keep properties fresh and to stay competitive. Cautious optimism reigns and budgets remain tight, so properties must prioritize spending to maximize ROI. These are some of the updates hotels are (or should be) spending money on.

Restored consumer confidence and business spending is bringing capital back to the hotel market sooner than many anticipated. Global and Irish hotel revenue per available room (RevPAR) is on the rise.

Renovate Hotel Property
Renovation is required for many properties—whether due to new ownership, re-flagging, property improvement plans (PIPs) or simply age—and can be implemented all at once or in phases. Public lobbies are renovated to offer a more flexible, comfortable, living room lounge, while upgraded spaces like meeting and conference rooms offer opportunities for increased event revenue. Back-of-house renovations improve operational efficiencies and maximize the use of real estate. And guest room renovations enhance customer comfort and loyalty.

Click on the link below to download the full 17 page guide to get the full guide packed with great ideas and advice.

Download the full expert advice guide here

 

 

Landmark Hotel

Adaptive Reuse

Adaptive reuse—the art and design science of reinventing buildings—occupies a small but powerful niche within the larger world of hotel development. It’s powerful because it gives hoteliers a way into otherwise impenetrable urban centres.

It also gives them a road less travelled. Let’s face it, turning a former office building (or warehouse or theatre) from the 1930s into a hotel demands not only creativity but an open mind. It demands that hoteliers “restart” their engines. By that, I mean redefining their expectations and their set of “givens” in a way that ground-up construction and/or renovation of existing hotel stock does not require. And did I mention the need for (really) over-the-top design thinking?

For instance, in an adaptive reuse project, a brand’s standard roster of room types may need to be tweaked and expanded to respond to the existing building’s physical constraints, which include structural columns, beams, elevator cores, existing stairs, loading docks, exterior windows and floor-to-floor heights. Traditional hotel space planning may need to be tossed, as well. Spaces may need to be rethought/reconfigured to fit the program elements into the existing architectural shell while simultaneously providing superb guest experiences and operational efficiency. Same with the usual formula for performance. It may need to be revised to account for these planning and construction adjustments.

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